Monday, January 12, 2009

"Changing Climate, Changing Times"

Last night on TV I came across a program on SBS entitled "Changing Climate, Changing Times." It looked right up my alley so settled in with a glass of wine...

I must say, I was a little disappointed with the overall tone of the movie. It was set in the year 2075 and showed the possible changes that global warming could bring and how humans might handle them. While it was optimistic in that it assumed that the world would stay populated (unlike some who believe that a few more degrees will be the very death of us and our civilisation), it also assumed that we would be miserable with the change. It showed fields filled with wind turbines and solar panels, yet the narrator still pinned for oil and the use of a car.

Are we really that shallow that we cannot see we made a mistake with the mass consumption of a finite product that took our mother earth millions of years to develop? Why do many people seem to think renewable resources are a step backwards? After watching people go back to using horse and their feet for transport(remember those funny little bony things attached to the ends of your legs - they aren't just there to stop you from falling over), I wonder why we don't see fossil fuel as a step backwards. Or perhaps an interesting little diversion from evolution. A detour we took to see if the journey would be any shorter - and in the earths case - it just may have been.

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6 comments:

Ken Yap said...

I just had some time to watch it on my recorder. I felt that it's rather hokey and sentimental. I'm not saying that the issue is not serious; global warming is deadly serious, but film seemed to make AGW look like just personal inconveniences sometimes, like when the baby came to term just as a fierce thunderstorm broke out.

Also does one really believe those Africans would meekly submit to being screened for a work permit to the EU? No, the EU would be fighting them off illegal boats with tear gas and tasers. There's going to be a lot more disaster and violence if the mercury keeps rising.

Some incongruities. They predict more droughts, and yet they say energy will come from hydro, solar and windfarms. Come again? Hydro? What, with the snow cover lost?

Also the doco felt like the makers were pleased as kids in a sweet shop to have a chance to play with computer generated imagery, much to the detriment of the message.

So sorry, it's a lightweight film. It tries to be entertaining, but this detracts from the story. I would be embarrassed to show it in a school.

Garden Nut said...

Ken,

I agree with a lot of what you have said. It was a great opportunity to showcase what could happen, but instead it pandered to our very selfish needs to stay exactly the same.

jxander said...
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Jordan Alexander Avery said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Garden Nut said...

All fixed up Jordan :-D

Jordan Alexander Avery said...

Thankyou